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TASAWAR Studio 1

SUMMARY

TASAWAR Curatorial Studios 2019. Studio1. Photo Malika Hagemann (1)
TASAWAR Curatorial Studios 2019. Studio1. Photo Malika Hagemann (3)
TASAWAR Curatorial Studios 2019. Studio1. Photo Malika Hagemann (2)
TASAWAR Curatorial Studios 2019. Studio1. Photo Malika Hagemann (4)
TASAWAR Curatorial Studios 2019. Studio1. Photo Malika Hagemann (5)
TASAWAR Curatorial Studios 2019. Studio1. Photo Malika Hagemann (6)
TASAWAR Curatorial Studios 2019. Studio1. Photo Malika Hagemann (7)
TASAWAR Curatorial Studios 2019. Studio1. Photo Malika Hagemann (9)
TASAWAR Curatorial Studios 2019. Studio1. Photo Malika Hagemann (11)
TASAWAR Curatorial Studios 2019. Studio1. Photo Malika Hagemann (10)
TASAWAR Curatorial Studios 2019. Studio1. Photo Malika Hagemann (12)
TASAWAR Curatorial Studios 2019. Studio1. Photo Malika Hagemann (13)
TASAWAR Curatorial Studios 2019. Studio1. Photo Malika Hagemann (18)
TASAWAR Curatorial Studios 2019. Studio1. Photo Malika Hagemann (14)
TASAWAR Curatorial Studios 2019. Studio1. Photo Malika Hagemann (19)
TASAWAR Curatorial Studios 2019. Studio1. Photo Malika Hagemann (20)
TASAWAR Curatorial Studios 2019. Studio1. Photo Malika Hagemann (23)
TASAWAR Curatorial Studios 2019. Studio1. Photo Malika Hagemann (22)
Photos: Malika Hagemann.

STUDIO 1 _ 12 Sept 2019

Introduction of Goethe-Institute: Slides by Emily Sarsam and Frederike Meyer

The Goethe-Institut is a non-profit German cultural association operating worldwide, promoting the study of the German language abroad and encouraging international cultural exchange and relations. Partners of the institute and its centers are public and private cultural institutions, the federal states, local authorities and the world of commerce. Much of the Goethe-Institut’s overall budget consists of yearly grants from the German Foreign Office and the German Press Office. The relationship with the Foreign Office is governed by general agreement. Self-generated income and contributions from sponsors and patrons, partners and friends broaden the scope of the work of the Goethe-Institut.

For TASAWAR Curatorial Studios as well as in all the projects of the Goethe-Institute, the cultural programmers are the organizational link between the experts, the content, the partners and spaces, the participants and the public. They foster the quality of their programs through active networking, mediating between scenes, disciplines and given frameworks. They try to master the art to select good ideas and to accompany them to turn into cultural practice.

Lecture-talk: Curatorial Acting by Bettina Pelz

1 _ Aspect of curatorial acting

The TASAWAR Curatorial Studios approach is based on the contemporary concepts that describe the curating of visual arts as composing or choreographing art displays around a central curatorial concept.

The concept defines the guiding idea and its contexts, it defines the matrix that frames the structure and the exhibition set, the selection of artistic positions and works as well as their interplay, the exhibition design, and the audience experience. The concept reflects and refers to additional parameters, part of the discussion were age, formation, and experiences of the artists, diversity of gender, geopolitical backgrounds and legacies of the art international scenes. The concept includes as well the approaches on communication, documentation, and dissemination as much as on art mediation and audience care.

The curatorial production encompasses planning, production, and display. It includes the care for technical production as well as for the open space that allows artistic research and development. Curatorial communication shapes communication and mediation, documentation and dissemination of exhibitions. It aims for polyphonic reviews and contributes to critical discourse, research and meta-development of the curatorial profession.

2 _ How to become a curator?

In spite of the existence of academic curatorial studies since the 1980s, present curators work on a broad diversity of backgrounds, formations, and training. A curatorial position should render visible backgrounds and mind-set of the curator.

3 _ What language do curators speak?

Curatorial language reflects vision, intellectual legacies and curatorial traditions of the curators. A curatorial position should sync the ambitions of the exhibition with those of text and images to communicate and to discuss the project to a diversity of audiences.

Excerise: Legendary Exhibitions on African Art by Bettina Pelz

Reading the texts, checking on title and concept of the exhibition, on responsible curators and their backgrounds, on participating artists and their works, on time and space of the displays, on impact and critic of the exhibitions. Summary and documentation of the findings are part of the homework.

STUDIO 1 _ 13 Sept 2019

Lecture-talk: Moving between languages by Aymen Gharbi

What language curators speak? A question that need to be raised during the traing program sue to the importance of language in general and specially in curatorial practice as it’s the mode of expression and locomotive of communication for curator beside the exibitions them self’s.
Curatorial texts are cauterized by the grammatic and content complexity but as well buy the dense meaning that curators try to transport.

It important to understand the lexicon and glossary used in curatorial writing but as well way of employing it. It’s also necessary to agree curatorial writing is very mush influenced by English language and the way that this language is employed and used by early curators.

Through history a specific language (English) is developed to carry meaning and concept of the exhibition making. In the publication INTERNATIONAL ART ENGLISH, Alix Rule and David Levine argue that “The internationalized art world relies on a unique language. Its purest articulation is found in the digital press release. This language has everything to do with English, but it is emphatically not English. It is largely an export of the Anglophone world and can thank the global dominance of English for its current reach. But what really matters for this language—what ultimately makes it a language—is the pointed distance from English that it has always cultivated. …”

We can observe several platforms and initiatives that start to collect, define, discuss and disseminate Art related languages:
TATE website has a dedicated page to ART TERMS
ONCURATING.org is an independent international web journal focusing on questions around curatorial practices and theory.
Through the first part the group focused on discussing the curator’s language following as well Bettina Pelz’s presentation in the first day.

At this point as Tunisian Curators we must ask ourselves what language we speak in our daily life and will that impact our thinking process and our practices.
The participant debated on the composition of Tunisian dialect/language that we speak. How it is influenced through history and how it’s still developing. Yet it’s impact on the Tunisian art context is not very visible and in the same time the art language is not adapted to the Tunisian dialect/languages and that is why there is still a lot of difficulties to mediate around art and disseminate it to the general audience.
Similar experience is encountered in Hungary where a lot of concept and wording is not transferable from English to Hungarian. That is why a transit.hu initiated a platform called CURATORIAL DICTIONNARY where they try to define curatorial wording in English but as well in Hungarian.
Can we start a similar process for Tunisian dialect/language?

The group discussed the importance of reflecting on this subject. The opinions where different how Tunisian in structured and if it’s relevant to use it for this purpose but they agreed that it’s crucial to find a way how to translate what we are talking about in curatorial practice to Tunisian dialect/language.

STUDIO 1 _ 14 Sept 2019

AGENDA

September 12, 2019 // 2.00 pm to 10.00 pm
Goethe-Institut, 6 Rue Du Senegal, Tunis 1002

1.30 pm
Arrivals

2.00 pm
Welcome by Goethe-Institute

2.30 pm
#Introduction of the team and the participants

3.30 pm
Break

4.00 pm
#Lecture-talk: About curatorial acting
Bettina Pelz

5.00 pm
Break

5.30 pm
#Exercise: Legendary exhibitions of African art
Bettina Pelz

7.00 pm
Summary, feedback, prep

8.00 pm
Collective Diner

10.00 pm
End

September 13, 2019 // 2.00 pm to 8.00 pm
Goethe-Institut, 6 Rue Du Senegal, Tunis 1002

1.30 pm
Arrivals

2.00 pm
Welcome by Goethe-Institute

2.30 pm
#TASAWAR Repository: Example of an artist’s profile: Nidhal Chamekh
Bettina Pelz

3.30 pm
Break

4.00 pm
#Tools: WordPress

4.30 pm
#TASAWAR Participants: Example of a personal profile: Bettina Pelz

5.00 pm
Break

5.30 pm
#TASAWAR Glossary: moving between languages
Aymen Gharbi

7.00 pm
Summary, feedback and prep

8.00 pm
End

September 14, 2019 // 2.00 pm to 8.00 pm // Site
Palais de Baron d’Erlanger

#Exercise
Contemporary art in dialogue with cultural heritage?
Bettina Pelz / Aymen Gharbi

4.00 pm
Selma Feriani Gallery, Place Sidi-Hassine, 8 Rue Taieb Mhiri, Carthage

#Exhibition visit: Nidhal Chamekh
#Interview: Selma Feriani

6.00 pm
Working session at an informal space like a coffee

7.00 pm
Plenum and feedback

8.00 pm
End